Mon-Fri 7am-5pm (MT)

Guidelines for Helping With Homework

By Dr. Charles Fay

Set aside a time each day for family learning.

Set aside at least 30 minutes, devoted to "family brain cell development." During this time, there should be no TV, video games, computer games, etc.
Model your own excitement for learning by reading a book, writing letters, etc.

Your child may learn by doing their homework, reading about something they love, writing stories, etc.

Help only when your child truly wants it.

Some parents make the mistake of forcing help upon their kids. This only creates frustration, anger, and kids who believe they can't learn without their parents' help.

Help only when there's an absence of anger or frustration.

When either you or your child gets frustrated or angry, learning becomes associated with frustration and anger.

Help only when your child can describe what the teacher said.

This ensures that your child continues to believe that it's important to pay attention to teachers.

Unfortunately, some kids learn that it's best to "tune–out" at school and let their parents do all of the teaching at home.

Move away from your child before he/she "gets it."

Some children believe they can only learn something, or "get it," when an adult is in the same room…or is guiding them every inch of the way.

To prevent this dependency, avoid falling into the habit of sitting at the table as your child does their homework, especially when they are on the brink of learning something new.

THE CARDINAL RULE FOR HELPING: Never Work Harder Than Your Child.

People who are really successful implementing this skill purchased From Bad Grades to a Great Life!

 

Printer Friendly PDF


©Charles Fay, Ph.D.
Permission granted for photocopy reproduction.
Please do not alter or modify contents.
For more information, call the Love and Logic Institute, Inc. at 800-338-4065.

[ back to article index ]